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Thread: First LM return this year. Would like advice

  1. #1

    First LM return this year. Would like advice

    I redeemed every paycheck in November and December in 2015. I'm a little confused about redeeming for a partial year. Any itemized deductions that I claim, should I only itemize for January through October since I used FRNs in that time frame? Should I not reduce my income on the 1040 at all for LM because it's only a partial year?
    Last edited by ADBrooks11; 02-03-16 at 01:34 AM.

  2. #2
    I have not been exposed to the ravages of filling out IRS Forms. This is why I do not really feel qualified to instruct people how to do it. I find them very stressful and simply do not need that kind of anxiety.

    I do however have a keen memory and pay attention to suitors and others, mostly Members here, and to the results they post and share. My impression is whether or not there is enough money in withholdings to bother. According to one suitor, you might redeem federal, as the attorneys know about redemption at the IRS but not bother with the state Form, for that little amount. This is because it seems that the attorneys at the state revenue agency like to play ignorant of remedy, and on a couple occasions that bled back to the IRS attorneys who began calling redemption frivolous the next year.

    - Or just settle up regular on the Form, as a gift. Then be pleased that you now have the redemption formula for 2016 and prepare for full redemption in your life, for the rest of your life. Partial years are messy and I imagine quite a problem for any IRS attorney to wrap his or her mind around.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by David Merrill View Post
    I have not been exposed to the ravages of filling out IRS Forms. This is why I do not really feel qualified to instruct people how to do it. I find them very stressful and simply do not need that kind of anxiety.

    I do however have a keen memory and pay attention to suitors and others, mostly Members here, and to the results they post and share. My impression is whether or not there is enough money in withholdings to bother. According to one suitor, you might redeem federal, as the attorneys know about redemption at the IRS but not bother with the state Form, for that little amount. This is because it seems that the attorneys at the state revenue agency like to play ignorant of remedy, and on a couple occasions that bled back to the IRS attorneys who began calling redemption frivolous the next year.

    - Or just settle up regular on the Form, as a gift. Then be pleased that you now have the redemption formula for 2016 and prepare for full redemption in your life, for the rest of your life. Partial years are messy and I imagine quite a problem for any IRS attorney to wrap his or her mind around.
    David,

    If the state is claiming a " taxpayer" who has redeemed lawful money for a partial year owes, do you suggest paying that amount and defer to the following year? Could that be construed as an admission of contract agreement for future returns?

  4. #4
    That is probably good sense to presume the presumption of a contract. Remedy was written into the 1913 Fed Act though, and it is still there according to Congress.

    It is even found at the end of the Canada Bank Act.


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    A uniform system with the US Dollar/Federal Reserve note?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by ADBrooks11 View Post
    I redeemed every paycheck in November and December in 2015. I'm a little confused about redeeming for a partial year. Any itemized deductions that I claim, should I only itemize for January through October since I used FDRs in that time frame? Should I not reduce my income on the 1040 at all for LM because it's only a partial year?
    No advice given... But IMO, you should study this 1040 help thread and all of its link thoroughly.

    Then study:
    http://1040relief.blogspot.com/
    http://lawfulmoney.blogspot.com/

    You must KNOW you are doing something lawful.

    Then consider joining:
    http://www.lawfulmoneytrust.com/

    BTW: I successfully did a partial year on my first filing for a lawful money "reduction" - NOT "deduction". Worked for Federal and 3 states that year.

    Now I use TaxAct and eFile... and get refunds within 2 weeks.

  6. #6

  7. #7
    ManOntheLand
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by ADBrooks11 View Post
    I redeemed every paycheck in November and December in 2015. I'm a little confused about redeeming for a partial year. Any itemized deductions that I claim, should I only itemize for January through October since I used FRNs in that time frame? Should I not reduce my income on the 1040 at all for LM because it's only a partial year?
    Don't file a "LM return"! You will very likely be penalized $5,000 sooner or later for filing a "frivolous tax return". If you want IRS out of your life, and you want an approach that actually works without risking penalties, contact deltawhiskey@protonmail.com for information on lawful tax avoidance.

  8. #8
    Redeeming lawful money is found at Section 16 of the Fed Act. What you suggest is appeasement and I can appreciate that. I like to think most of the Members and Readers here like the truth and have a bit more faith.

  9. #9
    ManOntheLand
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by David Merrill View Post
    Redeeming lawful money is found at Section 16 of the Fed Act. What you suggest is appeasement and I can appreciate that. I like to think most of the Members and Readers here like the truth and have a bit more faith.
    Yes Federal Reserve Act is law. And "gross income" is defined in IRC as "all income from whatever source derived, unless excluded by law".

    Is it not your position that Federal Reserve Act permits an exclusion of income from being subject to federal tax?

    Why then, would you have to report earnings as "gross income" on a 1040 in the first place?

    There was no suggestion of appeasement intended whatsoever. Perhaps you might request more information at deltawhiskey@protonmail.com before passing judgment.

    Bottom line: You are either a "taxpayer" (i.e. subject to an internal revenue tax) or you are not a taxpayer. If you are not a taxpayer and you do not want to be one, you must refrain from filing a 1040 that declares you had "gross income" above the exemption amount. "Gross income" is in quotes because it does NOT mean "everything that comes in" in the first place! See the U.S. Supreme Court in Southern Pacific Co. v Lowe:

    “We must reject…the broad contention submitted in behalf of the Government that all receipts—everything that comes in-- are income within the proper definition of “gross income” (in the Internal Revenue Code)…

    Returns are labelled "frivolous" by IRS not so much because the position taken is based on untrue facts (many frivolous positions are based on facts that are indeed true) but because under the circumstances, the position taken is irrelevant and is seen as being used to defeat and impede the administration of tax law upon "taxpayers".

    Filing a 1040 itself indicates you are a "taxpayer". It makes no sense to IRS that you would use a "taxpayer" form to declare yourself to not be a "taxpayer".

    It is a "U.S. Individual" form. See definition of "United States" at IRC 7701. You simply do not need a lawful money deduction (or any other deduction) if your earnings are not "gross income" in the first place. You may need to correct W-2 or 1099 information reported by third parties. But a 1040 tax return is not the way to do that, as many CTC filers can attest.

  10. #10
    My position is redemption.

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    Possibly you would benefit from a thread here - Exactly What Does the IRS Agent Think?

    Your appeasement seems oriented around an IRS agent's perceptions.
    Last edited by David Merrill; 02-06-16 at 01:21 PM.

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