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Thread: Proper disposal of old Slave Returns, receipts, etc.

  1. #1
    Junior Member djlamb's Avatar
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    Question Proper disposal of old Slave Returns, receipts, etc.

    I am cleaning out a storage unit and finding boxes of old TAX RETURNS, receipts, financial statements, and even some real estate paperwork.

    Before I was awake (and not aware of lawful money and what was really happening "in the country"), I would save old financial records for at least 7/10 years. Since I have been dealing with lawful money for two years and gradually moving everything into the private (vs the public), do I need to save this old stuff??

    I just want to shred it all and get rid of the clutter. ~ DJ Lamb (Michael Joseph II)

  2. #2
    If I had such papers I might view them as Minutes.

  3. #3
    Junior Member djlamb's Avatar
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    David, would you save years and years of minutes? Or chuck em'?

  4. #4
    Do you still trust the IRS?



    P.S. After a few hours I wish to elaborate.

    As the informer informing upon yourself during that time frame you have/had a trust relationship with the IRS. States typically duplicate the IRS policy, holding you responsible as the trustee over any charges - responsible fiduciary. One exception is the California Tax Franchise Board, they are particularly troublesome because they seem to have an independent tax code.

    The presentments are usually handled through Refusal for Cause and an evidence repository but it is the agent's job to keep the presentments coming. So that can happen.

    This brings up a whole bunch of subsequent questions about federal and state tax liens. Do you own a home, or do you wish to? I teach that even though through ignorance you were endorsing, the Bank and Fund was counting on that endorsement for things like the attached Credit Report.
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    Last edited by David Merrill; 05-07-16 at 09:28 PM.

  5. #5
    Junior Member djlamb's Avatar
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    No trust ever existed, so 'no'. I appreciate the response.

  6. #6
    That is the same old story.

    Some times I wonder if there is ever a signature line signed without there being a trust. It is wonderful when the emotion accompanies the express trust indeed. (In deed.) Especially if the Treasury sends you back part of the funds you have entrusted (withholdings) to the IRS, I find it difficult to believe there was no trust in place.

    Yet I know what you mean. If you register your car, that is an act of trust too. The birth certification...


    Even a naked contract; that is probably a blatant act of trust. Endorsement - so many people will sign the backside of their paychecks without ever knowing why. They trusted their parents?
    Last edited by David Merrill; 05-08-16 at 08:58 AM.

  7. #7
    P.S. Consider how many ignorant people are badgered into signing something, then walking away without a copy!

    Would any attorney consider that an act of trust?

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    Just an offer to discuss:

    Read the definition of the legal term "pledge" http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/pledge

    Often we are the only signatory on an "agreement". Could an offer have been made in general to the public? Or a privilege offered to anybody inclined? And we accept the offer by signing and pledging our acceptance and agreement? We step in voluntarily to the resultant "obligation", and from that point forward it is no longer voluntary, but we are now obligated? At least until we rescind or terminate?

    If one no longer is obligated, is he obligated to maintain records of his previous obligation? I think not.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Michael Joseph's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casper View Post
    Just an offer to discuss:

    Read the definition of the legal term "pledge" http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/pledge

    Often we are the only signatory on an "agreement". Could an offer have been made in general to the public? Or a privilege offered to anybody inclined? And we accept the offer by signing and pledging our acceptance and agreement? We step in voluntarily to the resultant "obligation", and from that point forward it is no longer voluntary, but we are now obligated? At least until we rescind or terminate?

    If one no longer is obligated, is he obligated to maintain records of his previous obligation? I think not.
    Agreed PLEDGE does come into play - see Isaiah 36 entire chapter. HOWEVER, what you want to study out carefully is UNDERTAKING. To undertake creates a quasi-contract and maybe even a trustee relationship. Certainly the promisee has the equitable right in the promiser to expect performance. Thusly the promiser has the legal duty to perform said promise.

    An undertaking or pledge only requires an implied act but most times express signature of the undertaker.
    The blessing is in the hand of the doer. Faith absent deeds is dead.

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