Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Social Security Payments are Required to be Electronic

  1. #1

    Social Security Payments are Required to be Electronic

    While applying for my Social Security payments I got the message these payments are required to be electronic unless the Department of the Treasury grants an exemption. I was expecting to have paper checks I can convert from FRN to lawful money with by the way I have been endorsing all other checks. Now it is not certain that I will be granted this exemption, and if I do not get it, there will be no paper check to endorse. How can I convert electronically deposited FRN to lawful money?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen View Post
    While applying for my Social Security payments I got the message these payments are required to be electronic unless the Department of the Treasury grants an exemption. I was expecting to have paper checks I can convert from FRN to lawful money with by the way I have been endorsing all other checks. Now it is not certain that I will be granted this exemption, and if I do not get it, there will be no paper check to endorse. How can I convert electronically deposited FRN to lawful money?
    The law reads that you must make your demand to the US Treasury. The IRS is agent of the Treasury and Instrumentality of Congress so the IRS forms do nicely with service/notice to the agent is service/notice to the principal. So there are ways to go about Notice of your Demand.

    My Lesson Plan includes setting you up with a record that best suits your situation. Look on www.lawfulmoneytrust.com where Michael Joseph and I have a variety of lessons about lawful money and trusts. There are some Coffee Chats available to everybody.

    My Lesson Plan is pretty simple and it is geared to get you correlating:

    • true identity
    • record forming - Refusal for Cause
    • redeeming lawful money


    You might consider whatever paper you sign, that grants the authority for direct deposit. Try to get that step printed out on paper, probably at your bank, so that you can sign it with your demand. If it is happening in Payroll or Personnel then I advise against that because your job might be on the line with you labelled a tax protester. So then a letter to the US Treasury might be the correct record - just to cover all your demands at each transaction. Once served on MNUCHIN you could serve it on your bank without your employer ever hearing wind of it.

  3. #3
    P.S. We have added Notice to the Crown for Canada - Her Majesty the Queen and I think Australia will be coming up very soon.

    Wiswall Paper on Admiralty.

  4. #4
    P.P.S. After 40 quarters - 10 years - you are no longer required to pay into SSI. This may mean your old age payments will be lower than if you keep paying in until retirement.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    295
    Yes, once you've accumulated at least 40 quarters of work in "covered employment" you're able to receive SS benefit payments upon retirement.

    And yes, a notice/letter to US Treasury/bank informing them of your demand for lawful money per 12 USC 411 for all transactions will cover you. This would make all income to your bank account, including electronic direct deposits, redeemed lawful money. It's a lawful money account.

    In Stephen's case it may not matter since SS income generally isn't taxed anyway. My retired parents receive SS income and they never pay income tax on it. In fact Stephen may not have to file a return at all:
    For tax year 2019, you will need to file a return if you are unmarried and at least 65 years of age, and your gross income is $13,850 or more. However, if you live on Social Security benefits, you don't include this in gross income. If this is the only income you receive, then your gross income equals zero, and you don't have to file a federal income tax return.
    https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tips...axes/L53Hx1v9W
    Last edited by lorne; 01-15-20 at 01:44 PM.

  6. #6

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •